A Brief Review of J. K. Rowlings’ Harry Potter by Chiedozie Ude

The Harry Potter series is a collection I hold dearly. The way the author was able to create a whole new civilisation that consisted of supernatural creatures such as wizards, witches, werewolves, goblins, etc., beats my wildest imagination.

The Harry Potter books are seven in number and they span 7 years of Harry Potter’s life: seven years of intense struggle against dark forces led by the evil Lord Voldemort. However, the use of flashbacks, in some places, make us realise that the conflict is one that began long before the main protagonist, Harry, was born. Retrospectively, one can say that all the events that occurred before Harry’s birth are significant to the development of the plot.

Stereotypically, Rowlings presents her conflict in the expected good-vs-evil format. Nevertheless, her story is purely original, both in terms of action and in terms of her character development. Harry alongside other members of Gryffindor are presented as the good guys while Lord Voldemort and his death-eaters are portrayed as villains. The originality of this exquisite work is augmented by the various plot-twists that arise as we seek a resolution to the conflict. For example, the killing of Dumbledore presented Professor Snape in a bad light, but at the end, it is discovered the Severus Snape was just acting on Dumbledores’ orders. Many readers did not see that coming because Rowlings was careful enough to hide the true loving and bold personality of Snape behind his gruff and mean facade.

Another thing of note in this text is how Rowlings is able to show contemporary issues. The real world, for instance, is divided based on racial and tribal lines. Identically, the world which Rowlings paints is split based on specie-lines; that is, there is a class difference between the wizards and the humans. In fact, this division cuts across various specie, with the wizards occupying the top of the food chain. The wizards reinforce their superior feelings by derogatorily calling humans “muggles”. Also, the offsprings of wizards who married humans were regarded as halfblood (similar to the term half caste) while wizards who had human parents were called “mud bloods”. Likewise, the wizards with two wizard parents were known as “pure bloods”. So, it is justifiable to say that the world of Harry Potter is a microcosm of the real world in terms of the malignant issue of discrimination.

In all, Rowlings is successfully able to pass across the message of true friendship and familial love. She preaches the power love possesses over evil. Little surprises when it is revealed that Harry’s mother’s love for him was the charm that prevented Voldemort from destroying Harry as a baby. Similarly, the strong bond between Harry, Hermione and Ron Weaselly was key to finally defeating Lord Voldemort.

I can write many pages on this books, but I think it is important for me to stop here in order not to spoil the book for those who wish to read it. Therefore, let this piece serve as a clarion call for you all to lose yourselves in the enchanting world of Harry Potter: a world that makes a child play the roles of men; a world whose civilisation relies on a boy — the boy who lived, Harry Potter.

However, the movie is a travesty of art.

The way so many events that occurred in the book were blatantly ignored in the movie makes me think that the movie is mediocre.

The director needs to face firing squad. Lol.
It is the same storyline though.

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