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Everywhere Konji!!! 85-Year-Old Woman Caught In A Group SXX With 5 Men. GBAMLOG.COM

85-Year-Old Woman Caught In A Group SXX With 5 Men

An 85-yr-old woman has been arrested after she was caught having group sxx in woodland in Connecticut, the United States in the penultimate week.

On Aug 9, concerned citizens called the police to report a public hook-up happening in the wooded area. The octogenarian was spotted with 5 elderly men including her husband having an orgy.

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All six were apprehended and charged with breach of peace.

The senior citizens are identified as Joyce Butler, 85 – the only woman participating in the orgy – her husband Richard Butler, 82; Daniel Dobbins, 67; Otto D. Williams, 62; Charles L. Ardito, 75; and John Linartz, 62.

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According to the Fairfield Police Department, the senior citizens were busted while getting hot and heavy at the Grace Richardson

The Scene of the group sex; and four of the culprits.

Conservation Area during a surveillance operation on public hook-ups in the area. Two of the suspects, Daniel Dobbins and John Linartz have additionally been charged with public indecency.

Dobbins was previously charged with second-degree breach of peace by Connecticut police after witnesses said they spotted him walking around a park naked before police found him inside his car “with his shirt and shorts draped over him and no underclothes.”

The culprits have been released and will appear in court at a later date.

Leave your comments below…

Source: dailyadvent

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Analysis on Matiiku by Chiedozie Ude. GBAMLOG.COM

Ude, Chiedozie Orji.
Department of English, UNILAG

Analysis on Matiiku

It is no news that trying to analyse a live performance is a tricky job. This trickiness may be as a result of different factors such as place and time— or more impressive, the complex nature of literature. Notwithstanding this difficulty, this paper will make an attempt to critically analyse the stage play entitled Matiiku. This essay will succinctly summarise the play and its subject matter, making use of factors such as the stage management and the gestures (which some may refer to as body language) of the actors to defend the choice of subject matter. The attention that will be paid to the factors stated above stems from the technical nature of the dialogue — that is, it was, to a very large extent, exclusively performed in the Yoruba language. However, the focus on the gestures and stage management does not in any way downplay the usefulness of the dialogue in this analysis because its importance in making the play fit its setting, and also, its subject matter cannot be overlooked. Also, it is important to note that this essay will include foreign references — that is, events or even books outside the narrative — which will be used support the arguments expressed in this paper. All these will be combined to comprehensively analyse this play.

This segment of the essay will comment on the playwright and the setting of the play. Not much is known about the playwright; hence, we move on to the setting of the play. The play is set during the colonial era, and this is reinforced through the manner in which the stage was set, and the numerous festivities which took place — the market scene; the baby/ritual scene; and the court dispute between the colonial district officer and the people. The latter is unarguably the strongest supporter of the claim that the play is set during the colonial era because it not only captures the communication problems that plagued the colonial masters due to their inability to grasp the local languages employed by their subjects, but also captures the presence of the white man (The district officer); hence, justifying the time setting— that is, the colonial period. The place setting of the play is Lagos. The introduction of three characters at the beginning of the play who represent the three white-cap chiefs of Lagos is testament to this fact. They, unequivocally, strengthen the play’s genre — that is, a historical play.

The subject matter of the play revolves around a man, who was predestined to be king, right from birth. This information was exposed by the narrator, before the start of the play. Hence, one can say that the plot of the play is based on the child, whom the oracle chooses as king. As expected, he becomes the king of Lagos once he attains adulthood; although, the colonial government later wrestled power from him. It is important to state that the fulfillment of the prophecy on the life of the king is a common motif in Yoruba themed plays— that is, the oracle can never be wrong— such as Ola Rotimi’s The Gods are Not to Blame, where the pronouncements of the oracle on the main character comes to pass. Therefore, one can be justified to state that there is a theme of fate (inevitable destiny) in the play. Another thing that is worthwhile to discuss is how the scenes in the play are linked by an interlude of music and dance. These performances (music and dance) may be regarded as entertaining because of the choreographic dance steps employed by the dancers. Being a traditional play, these songs should have deeper meanings, but that is not the focus of this essay. So, this analysis will rate the musical interlude from the standpoint of pleasure and entertainment.

One may describe the stage management as almost impeccable due to the perfect way the stage was set to represent the setting, and also, their flawless deployment of the lighting technique. To me, it is this lighting technique that makes the play stand out. The lights came up when and where necessary, not a second too early or late. Unarguably, the lighting technique was most effective when it was employed to show time — that is, day and night. This topnotch use of this technique is also brought to the fore when the lights were dimmed during the ritual scene. The solemnity and sacredness of the rituals were well captured by the eerily spooky umbrella of semi-darkness. This was enough to make the watcher understand the importance of these rituals. Another important thing I noticed due to the arrangement of the stage is the market scene. The market scene is crucial in traditional plays. The market is known as a place where rumours and stories thrive. Little wonder the birth of the would be king is announced in the market setting. The market scene is also ideal for announcement of the king’s birth because it reinforces Soyinka’s principle in Death and the King’s Horseman of the market place being a strategic location for the meeting of the three realities in Yoruba mythology — that is, the world of the unborn; the world of the living; and the world of the dead. It is important to note that the market place also serves as a link between these realities. Hence, this well believed myth strengthens the writer’s use of the market scene to announce a transition — that is, from the world of the unborn to the world of the living. The stage management was described as almost impeccable at the beginning of the paragraph because it had slight flaws. One of such flaws is the bad sound systems used in the play. Aside this, one can be justified to give the stage management crew an excellent score for a job well done.

Also, the gestures of the actors also enable non speakers of the Yoruba language to have an insight on some of the happenings in the play. The slow pace, with which those who are to make prophecies on the child move, gives insight to the audience that these men must be truly special and of high importance in the society. The greatness which is proclaimed on the baby is evident when the priests and other spectators bow to the child. However, the child’s mother refuses to bow to her child; hence, bringing into play the African belief that expects a child to prostrate himself to his parents, and not the other way round.

In conclusion, if I were asked to give my personal opinion on the play, I would rate it as a largely successful performance. The topnotch techniques employed by the stage management crew played a huge role in this. As a member of the audience who could not fully grasp the dialogues, I was entertained by the dance interlude. Hence, I can boldly describe the play as a successful one. In conclusion, this essay has made an attempt to analyse the production of the play Matiiku.

Works cited:
Ola Rotimi’s The Gods are Not to Blame.
Wole Soyinka’s Death and the King’s Horseman.

To Your Tent O Nigerians! By Chiedozie Ude. GBAMLOG.COM

Need we sacrifice our good men in altars of anarchy?
Need we accept mediocrity from our leaders due to tribal jaundice?
Need we turn a blind eye on events until it affects us?
I am tired.

The problems of Nigeria can be solved by our leaders, if only they could stop thinking through their noses. I have reserved my comments on the political happenings in Nigeria for some time because it has been discovered that nothing we say, as the masses, matters when the half-baked excuses for leaders make their half-baked decisions.

In Nigeria, today, it is Herdsmen; tomorrow, it is Boko Haram; and other times, it is one form of insecurity or the other. Is this the point where everyone takes up arms, since the organizations set up to protect lives have failed woefully? Is this the point where we substitute Buhari for biblical David by yelling to the wind the words “We have no inheritance in Buhari, the man from Daura, to your tents O Nigerians!” ?

Speaking about President Buhari, I say this in no uncertain terms: “Buhari has failed.” He is the most tribalistic ruler we have ever had in Nigeria, and what baffles me about this whole scandal is that his loyalists find out ways to derive a plethora of positives from Buhari’s multiple faux pas. It is not uncommon to hear them giving answers to questions like “Why is Buhari ruling without ministers?” with some tacky reply of this manner “He is doing so because he is still observing the situation, so as not to select the wrong individuals.” Really? If a president has no idea on whom to work with before he gets elected, then, he should probably retire to a farm. It is high time we stopped making excuses for mediocrity.

It is highly appalling that Buhari’s solution to the herdsmen’s menace was to introduce RUGA. On a less volatile day, RUGA is actually not a bad idea, but in the current state of affairs RUGA is not only insensitive, but also, stupid. Will RUGA bring back the lives that have been lost to the herdsmen’s blood lust? Will RUGA console the families of the deceased? Will RUGA replace the millions that have been lost as crop produce by farmers to these individuals? The answer is NO! Instead, the installation of these settlements will be a slap on the faces of those affected by these herdsmen. Why should evil be repaid with amnesty? Why should chronic murderers be allowed to live among peace-loving individuals?

Still talking about Buhari’s penchant for exercising illogical favouritism when dealing with the Fulani elements, one cannot help but notice the discrepancy with which he treated Biafran agitators. For holding peaceful protests, these agitators were subjected to the infamous “Operation Python Dance”. If peaceful agitators can be treated like war criminals, then, killers such as Boko Haram and the herdsmen should not be handled with kids’ gloves. If this is allowed to continue, then, we can be safe to call our military a battalion of bullies.

Writing this piece without suggesting a solution will render it useless. The simple solution to these issues is that the federal government should implement the resolutions arrived at the last National Conference. We should go back to regionalism — that is, a system whereby every tribe shall use its resources to develop itself. No excuses should be made for the north this time because they have always not been ready for things that will make Nigeria better. Was it not Ahmadu Bello that countered Anthony Enahoro’s motion for self-governance in 1953 by declaring that independence should be gotten as soon as “practicable”? Was it not Buhari that reneged on the national decisions made at the last conference? This is not a hate speech, it is simply a case of a Nigerian calling out cases where our leaders committed national suicide.

If the government cannot provide the conditions for peaceful co-existence, I will suggest that every Nigerian should take up arms and defend ourselves.

Lastly, I send my condolences to the family of the late Colonel Kingsley who was brutally murdered by the ruthless Boko Haram. May his soul rest in peace. May good men not die because of the carelessness of our leaders. Amen.